Airborne Paratrooper Jump Wings Parachutist’s Badge

$9.00

Made in the USA, this is a pair of clutch-back Silver-tone Jump Wings, also known as the Parachutist’s Badge. Paratroopers were authorized to wear them once they completed jump school.  The “pair of wings” refers to the wing on either side of the parachute.  For display or reenactor use. You will receive one pin.

Returns: 30 Days

Categories: , , Tags: ,

Description

Made in the USA, this is a pair of clutch-back Silver-tone Jump Wings, also known as the Parachutist’s Badge. Paratroopers were authorized to wear them once they completed jump school.  The “pair of wings” refers to the wing on either side of the parachute.  For display or reenactor use. You will receive one pin.

Airborne Parachute Badge

Airborne Parachure Badge back

HISTORY OF THE AIRBORNE PARACHUTE BADGE

The first Parachute badge was designed during World War II by Captain (later Lieutenant General) William P. Yarborough of the 501st Parachute Battalion.  Starting on March 3, 1941, he sketched a design that was formally approved on March 10, 1941. By March 14, 1941, he had 350 of the badges procured from the Bailey, Banks & Biddle Company in Philadelphia, PA.

The senior and master parachutists badges were authorized by Headquarters, Department of the Army in 1949 and were announced by Change 4, Army Regulation 600-70, dated 24 January 1950.

Airborne wings had very little variation between manufacturers during the war. However, wings often had different closures based on their manufacturer.  English made wings have a crude hook and loop type closure by American standards, while stateside wings normally were either pinback or clutch back. Clutch backs are still used today. At the time, clutch back fasteners cost more and they were preferred by many because it was much easier to put them on straight!

 

 

Additional information

Weight 4 oz

Pin It on Pinterest